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Oscar beauty secrets

The wonderful glitzy world of Hollywood is a world of multi-million-dollar mansions, multiple muscle cars, haute couture and haute cuisine. Its denizens; beautiful people who seemingly don’t suffer from zits, dark spots and cellulite. And year after year, they seem to age backwards, or at least, age ever so slowly. The American film industry’s awards season officially ends with the Oscars—the biggest and most anticipated event on the Hollywood calendar. And the stars and starlets are pulling out all the stops to make sure that they appear perfect when they walk down the red carpet for the whole world to see. No one wants to be on the worst-dressed list, that’s for sure. To complement their McQueens and Lhuilliers and Louboutins, the ladies have gone through intensive skincare treatments. The desired results include erasing a few years off their faces and looking positively radiant and impossibly fresh. If you’re thinking that they went to the spa for a simple facial, you couldn’t be more wrong. These flawless beauties go to extreme lengths to achieve that youthful appearance. It’s not just because they use a really good cream. Hollywood insiders say that all the craze among celebrities today is the so-called Vampire facelift. It’s called “Vampire” for two things. One, it gives instant results and prevents excessive skin aging like you were a vampire. And two, the procedure involves drawing blood from your body and injecting it back in like you were bitten by a vampire. As explained by plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Nassif (from The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills), the Vampire facelift combines hyaluronic acid fillers with your own blood to stimulate the collagen in your skin, revitalize your skin’s volume, texture, tone and laxity and soften wrinkles. It’s said to be especially effective on problem areas such as smile lines, lip border and tear trough. Fillers and injectables are a favorite quick fix for instant skin lifting. Another procedure, called Baby Drop Filler, uses designer needles and tiny drops of hyaluronic acid fillers to achieve temporary natural-looking results, enough to fool the world for at least one paparazzi-infested night. On the other hand, Botox Lite give you a softer, more relaxed look. For a gradual, yet long-lasting effect, a Vitamin IM Injection Facial is recommended, in which vitamins B and C are injected directly into the muscle to maintain the skin’s naturally-occurring collagen. Not too fond of needles? Get an Electric Facial. This treatment is touted as the solution for the skin losing its fullness with too much injections. A-list celebrities like Kate Winslet, Madonna and Uma Thurman are said to be “fans” of the procedure that uses low levels of electricity to stimulate and tone facial muscles. Don’t want electricity anywhere near your face? Try the Geisha Facial offered at the Shizuka New York Day Spa in Manhattan. Yes, the facial sounds sexy, but if you know what they’ll be putting on your face, you might gag a little bit. The skin exfoliating treatment uses a powdered substance imported from Japan to apply on the face. The catch is, this powder is made of nightingale bird droppings. I’m just going to let that thought sit there for a while. So you see, beauty is not a glamorous business after all. As you watch the Oscar red carpet coverage and you find yourself thinking how young and beautiful these actresses are, remind yourself the amount of money, effort and maybe yuckiness that went into achieving that illusion of perfection. Without all that work, everyone would simply look, well, regular.
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